Brushing off the Cobwebs…

The once green fields have been stripped of their will to live. After many months of being denied of their need of quenching, they will be saved by being awo…*thud*…*thud*… HE IS BACK!…

Hellooo fellow Astrogeeks,

Why yes, it has been a very long while since I last graced you all with a blog post. I only hope you are still keen to read the ramblings of a would-be astronomer. For clarification, and just in case your memory is terrible, an astronomer. Not, and I repeat, not an astrologer. Sadly the arbitrary alignments of planets are not causing the crappy events across the world we are currently seeing. So you (well, not all of you) put down that horoscope.

But you have been gone so long my mind has melted into acceptance, and blind following of alt-facts. It was all I had.

*Grumbles and sighs*… Urgh! Let’s, let’s not get onto that topic for now. I am dreadfully sorry though for not keeping you engaged through the eyes of a scientific mind. I can see why the last 12 months alone would have ultimately led to the ‘great purge’ of any good I did to your mind…

Well, I guess you could start by telling me where you have been? What’s happened in your world of academic-ness? Did you finish your M.Phil?

Hmm, well, aside from most of the last year being all blurry as it whiz-banged by with a crap load of stuff happening all at once, I did complete my M.Phil. After a grueling few months writing my M.Phil thesis I submitted it in May. The scary bit however was the  oral examination, the more posh Latin way academia puts it is ‘viva voce’, or just ‘viva’ for short. This is made up of a panel of an external examiner from another university/institution, an internal examiner and a chair Eventually a date was set for my viva, 12 August 2016, and the day came round rather quickly.

Sounds rather daunting, were you not cacking yourself?

That is a rather crude way of putting it, but yes, yes I was absolutely “cacking” it. So, suited and booted to impress my examiners I did nothing but pace back and forth so as to gather my thoughts. I knew in my anxiety I would forget things, as it has always been a strong inhibitor in my recall. However, I was successful in defending my work and confirming I did do everything, which is the point of the whole thing. With minor corrections needed I got to work on, well, correcting! Before a final version was accepted and then bound into a lovely book. I do to occasionally like to caress it, as sad and weird as that may sound… Anyway, after handing in my bound copies I was awarded the M.Phil and received my certificate in December. If you’d like to see it, then look below! I also get another chance to dress up and get robed in June.

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My funky M.Phil certificate

So, is that it? What are you doing now? I thought you would be going onto a PhD?

Well, I am doing exactly that right now. At the beginning of 2016 I was hunting around for PhDs, and sadly I had missed the window for quite a few since I was focusing on my M.Phil at the time. In short, however, I applied to the University of Hull and I am here now. Currently researching galaxy clusters in an attempt to better understand how the kinematics and dynamics of clusters of galaxies affects their evolution, morphology (shape), colour etc.

Does this mean you are going to open a ‘PhD Adventures’ section on your blog?

That is what I am now hoping to do yes. I want to keep up with this blog and properly document (British) PhD life for you all. On a weekly basis. So, in short expect to see updates on this site shortly. I might even spruce it up to look all pretty. Anyway, I must be off now for I have to endure 3 days worth of Health & Safety training in the morning, oh the joys.

So long astrogeeks, until next time!

Yours,

TheObAstro

Philosophising Update of the Master Variety

…*Prod*…*Prod*…*Poke*…*Thwack!*  Wake up Lawrence!

Gaahh!… First of all “ouch!”, and secondly, I’ve been too busy to update this blog as often as I’d have liked to, so I’m sincerely sorry for me being pretty much a useless fool. However I’m here now, and wow, it’s amazing how quickly time has just flown on by these past 3 months.

Sorry about hitting you, but anyway, what have you been doing these past few months?

I probably deserved the slap, as I should probably slow down now as we come close to Christmas… So, what have I been doing? Mostly reading, or at least attempting to read as reading academically can be a bit challenging at first, but the simplest workaround is to only focus on 3 key areas (A good tip for any aspiring researcher); The Abstract, Introduction and Conclusion.

But what’s so important about these 3 points, and why are you reading, shouldn’t you be finding something new; ground-breaking nuggets of knowledge?

Well, reading is a key starting point for anyone researching a particular area, everyone focuses on one niche area at a time; if you don’t have the background understanding then you can’t build upon our current understanding. So, in short I’m starting some research into an area of astronomy I’m not so well rehearsed in and so therefore I have a lot of reading of academic papers, firstly on background, and then diverging off into areas related to what work I’ll be doing. And this brings me to the 3 key points; the abstract, a concise overview of the point to the paper, the results and conclusions/findings from the research; the introduction, setting the scene or providing the background so we can understand the point to the research along with what questions we hope to answer; finally the conclusion, which simply puts the results together to assess whether anything meaningful lies within the data.

As for the “ground-breaking nuggets of knowledge”, well, that’s something that could come late ;-). This is the beauty of science my fellow astrogeeks, whether your hypothesis is correct or not it doesn’t matter, it’s still progress as you eliminate one possibility out of many. Anyway, that’s enough of me waffling about those bits!

Well, it sounds interesting, so may I dare ask as to what it is you’re working on?

Hmm… Well, luckily it’s not top-secret so I think I can spare a few words to describe what I’m doing, but don’t worry, I won’t bore you to death with in-depth details for now. Basically I’m using data from NASA’s Spitzer (Infrared) Space Telescope, and what I’ve been doing so far has been to “mine” through this data for any spectra data on Quasars; which are said to be the progenitors of all Galaxies by most in the argument chain. More specifically I’m looking for ‘PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon) features’, these are long chain molecules in space that emit light in the infrared when excited by UV photons from stars, these molecules can therefore be used to trace the star formation rate (SFR) to a certain degree; know the total infrared luminosity then you know the SFR. From this we want to see if the star formation lies close to or far away from the quasar; this will give us clues as to what affect the quasar has on star formation, as it’s most commonly agreed that they retard such stars from forming with the intense radiation field that surrounds them. It’s rather interesting :-D.

Wow, so many questions, you’ve bamboozled me… So, I’ll ask the complex ones another time after my brain’s recovered, but how have you been getting on?

Haha, well, don’t worry I’ll try and make everything I do and say as accessible as possible :-), but for the most part it’s been going well. Astronomy in the modern world is predominantly computer based, and (oddly) filled with mac users, however that shouldn’t come as a surprise with the flexibility of using UNIX. The computing side mainly means I use them to help analyse data, the reason, well machines can do perform routines and calculations far quicker than us, but they are still ‘stupid’ to the extent that they require human input to give them ‘orders’ so to speak; essentially I program using a syntax known as Python. Luckily Spitzer has it’s own suite of software developed by academics at Cornell University in America (whom one of them is my supervisor), this software is known as SMART (Spectroscopic Modelling Analysis and Reduction Tool); it can obtain spectra from the data taken by the spectrograph on Spitzer. This software is brilliant, but trying to get it to work has spent a large chunk of my initial hours, the downside to computing reared its ugly head, so after battling for days on my desktop, and then on the loaned out macbook I have, I am now ready to properly utilise any data of quasars containing PAH features. But of course, now as we are heading to Christmas I have since been given the task by my supervisor to create my own routines for the .fits files containing the spectra, in order to streamline the analysis process without using IDL (a annoying, but powerful programming language), as well as for quick referencing.

Aside from the computing, I have been reading, compiling comprehensive lists on the objects I’ve found to have PAHs, as well as starting to scrutinise the data to see if these things are extended from the central source or not.

So in short fellow astrogeeks, it’s been tough and very busy, I’m seemingly working hard and long hours (sometimes 10-11 hour days), but ends with something not so obviously fruitful; quintessentially it’s very slow going. However this hasn’t deterred me, this is research, it’s never simple or painless, just a bloomin’ drag ;-)…

Anyway catch you later fellow astrogeeks, I’ll blog again (hopefully) soon.

Happy Christmas!

The ObAstro.